Results tagged ‘ Kei Igawa ’

Yankees To Learn If They Are With Or Without Yu

“Sleight of hand and twist of fate
On a bed of nails he makes us wait
And we wait without Yu

With or without Yu
With or without Yu”

                                                                             - Lyrics (with slight revision) of a popular U2 song

After ducking and coyly answering questions about whether the New York Yankees have any interest in Japanese pitching star Yu Darvish, general manager Brian Cashman will finally have to lay his cards on the table on Wednesday by 5 p.m. Eastern time.

That is the deadline for all teams who are interested in Darvish’s services have to come up with what is called a posting (or bid) to the Hokkaido Nippon Ham Fighters, the team for which Darvish has toiled since he was 18. That bid goes from the team with the highest bid to the Fighters and it only earns the team a 30-day window to negotiate a contract for Darvish. If the team fails to agree with Darvish on a contract the posting money is returned to the American team and Darvish remains with the Fighters for another season.

For all the successes some Japanese players have had in America (Ichiro Suzuki, Hideki Matsui and Hideo Nomo) there have also been some monumental failures (Hideki Irabu, Kei Igawa and to some degree Daisuke Matsuzaka). So on which side of this equation does Darvish fit?

Scouts who have been watching him the past six years have seen a skinny 6-foot-5 right-hander mature into a 220-pound dynamo. On the world stage at the Olympics and the 2009 World Baseball Classic, Darvish has shined, winning the Most Valuable Player Award for Japan’s winning WBC team.

In his seven seasons with Nippon Ham he is 93-28 and since 2007 he has recorded ERAs below 2.00 in five consecutive seasons. In 2011, he was 18-6 with a 1.44 and 276 strikeouts and only 36 walks in 232 innings.

He throws in the mid-90s on his fastball and he throws both a two-seam and four-seam variety along with a cutter. He has three breaking pitches and some believe he throws a decent changeup. But unlike Matsuzaka, who throws pitches off the plate to get batters to swing, Darvish attacks the strike zone and is confident in his ability to get batters out.

Will the talents of Darvish translate to American baseball?

New Boston Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine, who managed for six years in Japan, certainly knows Darvish well and likes what he has seen of him. The Yankees have scouted him and Texas Rangers general manager Jon Daniels has seen him pitch in person.

But no club is willing to say out loud they are interested in bidding for Darvish because they know that will only drive up the price of the posting. In 2006, the Red Sox bid $51 million to the Seibu Lions for Matsuzaka. They later signed him to a six-year, $52 million contract.

The posting for Darvish could very well easily eclipse the $51 million Seibu received from the Red Sox. Some say that the absence of quality pitching in the American free-agent market this winter gives teams an opportunity to sign what could potentially be a No. 1 starter for less money than the Angels paid to sign Rangers left-hander C.J. Wilson.

The reason is the posting fee does not count toward a team’s payroll. The only money that counts is the money paid to Darvish. Because Darvish is just 25, a team could structure a long-term graduated contracte that pays Darvish about $10 million the first season and up to about $15 million in the final season. Wilson is being paid $20 million per season by the Angels. So Darvish actually could be a bargain at half the money the first season.

There are also many teams who can’t afford to get into the bidding in the first place due to payroll issues. The Boston Red Sox, for one, are out the bidding because they need to re-sign free agent David Ortiz and his contract will put them perilously close to the $178 million mark in which the luxury tax kicks in. New Red Sox GM Ben Cherington said the Red Sox will not raise their payroll past that level so Darvish will not be a target.

The Angels seem pretty much tapped out after their signings of Wilson and first baseman Albert Pujols. The Marlins have also spent a lot on closer Heath Bell, shortstop Jose Reyes and starter Mark Buerhle.

So just where are the Yankees in all this?

They have spent only $5.5 million to re-sign free-agent starter Freddy Garcia and $2.5 million for the rights to Japanese infielder Hiroyuki Nakajima of the Seibu Lions.

Though Cashman looked at the free-agents starters available, he determined that their cost was much more than he thought they were worth. It was, by far, not a buyers’ market for such limited talent available.

So Cashman spent the Winter Meetings last week trying to gauge the availability of starting pitchers via the trade route and came up empty again. He looked at possible deals for pitchers such as Gio Gonzalez of the Athletics, Matt Garza of the Cubs, Jair Jurrgens of the Braves and John Danks of the White Sox.

But each time he asked teams what they wanted in return the names of the Yankees’ best prospects such as catcher Jesus Monetro, pitchers Dellin Betances and Manny Banuelos or outfielder Mason Williams came up. Cashman seems loathe to deal away the best prizes of the minor-league system the Yankees have rebuilt over the past five years.

There also was interest in some homegrown Yankee major leaguers such as Brett Gardner, Eduardo Nunez, Phil Hughes, David Robertson and Phil Hughes. But Cashman did not want to go there either.

So just how interested could the Yankees be in Darvish?

My gut feeling is very interested.

The reason is that unlike trades, a free-agent signing means you can keep your young talent. In addition, with the signing of a Japanese pitcher like Darvish the Yankees do not lose a draft pick like when they sign a Type A free agent stateside. Keeping the farm system intact and not having to surrender a draft pick for Darvish appears to be win-win situation for Cashman.

The fact that teams like the Red Sox and Angels are out of the bidding also seems to bode well. The only teams strongly rumored to be interested in Darvish are the Texas Rangers and Toronto Blue Jays. The Yankees simply have more financial resources to put toward a bid than those teams. It is a question of just how much of a bid do the Yankees put forward.

The $51 million bid the Red Sox made for Matsuzaka shocked Cashman, who was believed to have bid a little more than half that amount. But the Red Sox were desperate for pitching and they wanted to ensure they would not lose out to the “Evil Empire” that stole Cuban star Jose Contreras away from them years earlier.

This posting looks to be definitely different. There has been less hype and teams have been very circumspect in their public statements.

But if Cashman really wants Darvish, it stands to reason he will be able to convince Hank and Hal Steinbrenner to provide the cash it will take to get it done.

With the time difference in Japan it likely won’t be until Thursday before we find out something about Darvish. The team ownership of the Fighters have four days to accept the highest bid. But I don’t think it will be that long before we hear who has submitted the high bid.

For the sake of Yankee fans, let’s hope that Caahman is the man with the biggest grin this week. Yankee fans need to see some movement towards improving the team for 2012 and Darvish could be the one piece of the puzzle that gets the team just a bit closer to the goal of winning their 28th world championship.

The key to that is pitching, pitching and more pitching. Right now the Yankees just have pitching.

But I can just hear Yankee fans rising in their seats and shouting through the Bronx night air “Yu, Yu, Yu.” Music to my ears!

 

Secrecy Veils Cashman’s Trip To Winter Meetings

NEW YORK YANKEES WINTER MEETINGS PREVIEW

One person you are not likely to see much of at the Hilton Anatole in Dallas on Monday is Yankees general manager Brian Cashman.

As baseball’s 2011 Winter Meetings open, Cashman habitually spends most of his time in his suite. And it is not because he is diving into the honor bar. Cashman is in “bunker mode” hoping to make a deal or signing or two that will help the Yankees improve for the 2012 season.

Of course, Cashman has already done a few important things that will help the Yankees in the upcoming season.

The most important mission he had this offseason was keeping ace left-hander CC Sabathia from opting out of his contract and becoming a free agent. Cashman was able to get Sabathia to sign an extension through 2016 worth $122 million. So that took what would have been the most-prized pitcher off the market and kept him with the Yankees.

Determined to ensure the Yankees enter 2012 with a solid starting rotation, Cashman set the Yankees priorities as “pitching, pitching and pitching.” That is why the Yankees picked up the options on Nick Swisher and Russell Martin and is allowing Jorge Posada to go as a free agent.

The only major signing of a non-pitcher this winter was the signing of infielder Jayson Nix to a minor-league contract with an invitation to spring training. Nix, primarily a second baseman, can also play third base and has logged some time in the outfield.

Nix, 29, played for Toronto in 2011 and hit .169 with four home runs and 18 RBIs in 136 at-bats in 46 games. He has hit .209 over the span of four major-league seasons.

Nix is an insurance policy in case reserve first baseman and third baseman Eric Chavez decides to retire or signs with another club as a free agent. The Yankees have made it clear they would love to have Chavez and free-agent outfielder Andruw Jones return to the team next season.

So when it comes to the Yankees’ starting lineup and bench, the Yankees pretty much are looking at a status quo with rookie catching prospect Jesus Montero expected to be the team’s primary designated hitter in 2012 replacing Posada.

Cashman proved how important he values pitching by re-signing Freddy Garcia to a one-year contract worth between $4 million and $5 million. Garcia, 35, was selected as a starter out of spring training after he signed $1.5 million contract over the winter. Garcia posted a 12-8 record with a 3.62 ERA in 25 starts (over 26 games).

With Garcia’s signing the Yankees rotation features Sabathia, rookie surprise Ivan Nova, a recovering Phil Hughes, enigmatic veteran A.J. Burnett and Garcia. That starting five does not exactly appear to be a championship caliber staff if you ask most Yankee fans. So the speculation has been that Cashman would dip into the Yankees’ rich financial reserves to pony up some big money for free-agent pitchers C.J. Wilson, Mark Buerhle, Roy Oswalt or Edwin Jackson.

Or Cashman might look to make a substantial posting bid for 25-year-old Japanese pitching star Yu Darvish.

The Yankees have also been linked in trade rumors for pitchers such as Matt Cain of the Giants, Jair Jurrgens of the Braves and Matt Garza of the Cubs.

Of course, Cashman has a collection of six pitchers in the organization who are currently 24 years old or less who could advance to help the major-league club as starters or relievers in 2012 including Manny Banuelos, Dellin Betances, D.J. Mitchell, Hector Noesi, David Phelps and Adam Warren.

Noesi compiled a 2-2 record with a 4.47 ERA in 30 games (two starts) over four separate stints with the Yankees last season. Cashman has been getting glowing reports about how Noesi is throwing this winter in the Domincan Republic and he is touting Noesi as the “next Ivan Nova.”

So the Yankees could go in a lot of directions this winter with their pitching staff: (1) they could stand pat, (2) sign a free agent, (3) trade for a starter or (4) look to shore up the staff with a young pitcher in their minor-league system.

But any addition to the staff surely would mean that one of the current five starters would either have to go to the bullpen or leave the team entirely. That will not include Sabathia, Garcia or Nova. So that means Hughes and Burnett might be in the crosshairs should the Yankees decide to add another starter.

Hughes was 5-5 with a 5.79 ERA in an injury-plagued 2011 season. However, if you throw out his first three starts when he was pitching with a weak right shoulder and two consecutive starts in August in which he gave up 12 runs in 8 1/3 innings, Hughes was 5-3 with a 3.38 ERA in his other nine starts.

What this would indicate that is if Hughes is healthy at the start if spring training there is a good possibility he could return to his 18-8 form of 2010. The Yankees have heard good reports about Hughes, 25, who is working out in his native California this offseason.

Hughes has pitched well in the bullpen before as he did in the Yankees’ championship season in 2009, however, the Yankees are stocked with right-handers Mariano Rivera, Rafael Soriano, David Robertson and a recovering Joba Chamberlain. There does not seem to be much room left for Hughes here. So, for now, Hughes is a starter.

Burnett, 34, is another story altogether.

Though Burnett’s Game 4 start against the Tigers in the American League Division Series was excellent, he is coming off two seasons in which he was a combined 21-26 with a 5.20 ERA. Because the Yankees owe Burnett $65 million he has been the proverbial albatross around the Yankees necks and he possibly could remain that way for another two seasons.

The Yankees could hope that Burnett somehow finds a way to consistently put the ball in the vicinity of the plate and cuts down on his gopher balls or they could also decide – like a malignant tumor – he must be removed from the roster even if it means that the Yankees have to pick up most, if not all, of his contract to pitch for another team.

Yankee fans are certainly rooting for the latter. They have seen enough of “Bad A.J.” to know that it is time to bring the curtain down on his bad act.

Other than that potential shift in the rotation, the only other move Cashman likely could make is to add a left-hander to the bullpen.

Boone Logan, 27, has been the lone lefty in the bullpen for two seasons. Though he did OK with a 5-3 record and a 3.46 ERA in 2011, he is not, by definition, a real lefty specialist. He has been pressed into that role due to injuries to Damaso Marte and Pedro Felciiano the past two seasons.

But Marte has been released and Feliciano has undergone shoulder surgery and he won’t pitch at all under the final year of his two-year deal with the Yankees. So the Yankees do need to explore obtaining a lefty who can consistently retire left-handed batters.

Cashman could really help the Yankees out a lot by finding the one piece of the puzzle that would make the Yankees’ bullpen even better than it already is.

Also do not be surprised if Cashman comes up with a surprise or two, much like he did with Granderson deal two winters ago.

Cashman always plays his cards close to the vest and he never really signals what he is likely to do. That is why if a rumor surfaces about the Yankees interested in making a deal, I automatically discount it. Cashman does not make deals that are rumored in the press. He does it with cunning and stealth.

Although Cashman has signed disasters like Burnett and Kei Igawa, he also has made some nice deals such as the Granderson and the Swisher deals. Although it appears Cashman is likely to use a scalpel and a Band-Aid rather than a hacksaw to this winter’s roster, you never really know if players like Swisher, Eduardo Nunez, Montero or Betances could be traded in order to obtain the pitching help the Yankees seem to need.

If you do not see Cashman much in the hotel lobby you can almost be assured he is stoking the fears of his rival GMs. That is just the Cashman way.

 

Yanks’ Targets Include Wilson, Darvish, Buerhle

With the New York Yankees seemingly in the market for some starting pitching help this winter, one cold, hard fact is obvious when looking at the potential free agents available: This is a thin market. There is a good reason for that. Teams have been much more diligent in identifying there talented young pitchers and locking them into long-term deals that cover their arbitration-eligible years. Thus, instead of becoming free agents when they are 27, pitchers are being locked into deals until they are in their 30s. That is why there is not a Felix Hernandez, Justin Verlander or Jared Weaver out on the open market. But let’s take a deeper look into what is available and rate the pitchers who should be at the top of the Yankees’ Christmas shopping list.

C.J. WILSON

As I posted earlier, the top target on the Yankees’ list is currently C.J. Wilson of the Texas Rangers.

Wilson is a 31-year-old left-hander who was 16-7 with a 2.94 ERA in 2011. On the positive side, Wilson is a lefty and the Yankees did miss have a second lefty in their rotation when Andy Pettitte chose to retire after the 2010 season. The record and ERA he posted also show that Wilson was an effective pitcher for the American League champions.

Wilson also has pitched only two seasons as a starter. He has a combined record of 31-15. Since he was a relief pitcher for the Rangers for his five previous major-league seasons, Wilson does not have the normal wear and tear on his arm a normal 31-year-old would have. He also was the ace of the Rangers’ staff in 2011.

But there are some negatives.

The most glaring is that Wilson is 1-5 in his nine postseason starts with an ERA of 4.82. He was 0-3 with a 5.79 ERA this past postseason. So maybe Wilson is not quite ready for prime time as his regular season record might indicate. The Yankees would prefer to have a proven postseason winner like a Pettitte rather than a guy who will not deliver when it counts.

Wilson may not be that guy.

However, Wilson remains the top target of a lot of teams such as the Washington Nationals, the Los Angeles Angels and the Arizona Diamondbacks. Not to mention the Rangers would love to keep Wilson in the fold themselves.

But the biggest factor in Wilson’s favor is that his price will not even come close to that paid to Cliff Lee by the Philadelphia Phillies last winter. Lee received a five-year, $120 million contract. Wilson will not receive offers anything close to that because he is not in Lee’s neighborhood as a pitcher.

Wilson likely will get offers of around four years and $80 million. The Yankees can certainly afford that since they did not have to really break the bank to retain ace lefty CC Sabathia. Sabathia did not opt out of his contract, which would have driven his price up. Instead he signed a modest extension, leaving some dollars for general manager Brian Cashman to offer Wilson a nice deal.

It is pretty obvious with Phil Hughes, A.J. Burnett and Ivan Nova lined up behind Sabathia in the Yankees’ rotation, the Yankees will look to add at least one free agent to the mix. There could be a possibility of two.

Wilson stands above the rest of the free-agent class and Cashman will likely stay in the bidding with Wilson’s agent, Bob Garber.

YU DARVISH

Yu Dravish comes with a gigantic question mark because he is not officially a free agent yet.

Darvish, 25, is the best pitcher in Japan and likely would become the best starting pitcher ever to pitch in the major leagues from Japan. He currently is pitching in the playoffs in Japan with the Nippon Ham Fighters. Nippon is in a bad situation with the right-hander.

They do not have the financial ability to keep him and they would benefit greatly by “posting” him. That would allow the team to receive bids just for the right to speak to his agent. That money would allow the Ham Fighters to rebuild their team with a huge infusion of cash.

Daisuke Matsuzaka drew a huge posting fee of $50 million from the Boston Red Sox. The Red Sox then signed Matsuzaka for $53 million for a total investment of $103 million (of which only the salary of $53 million counted against the salary cap for the Red Sox).

Darvish is somewhat different than “Dice-K.”

Darvish is 6-foot-5, 190 pounds. He also is of part Middle Eastern descent. But what really sets Darvish apart is his ability to throw fastballs in the upper 90s, in addition to an excellent array of breaking pitches. But Darvish does not nibble with pitches out of the strike zone like Matsuzaka. He attacks hitters.

In his six seasons in Japan, he is 88-33 with five seasons of an ERA under 2.00. He also has pitched against the world’s best hitters as the MVP of the last World Baseball Classic as he led Japan to victory.

The negatives are that Japanese pitchers have not fared well as starters in the States. The most successful was Hideo Nomo, who was 123-109 with a 4.24 ERA in 11 major-league seasons. There also have been the Hideki Irabus and Kei Igawas the Yankees have signed and become dismal failures.

Japanese pitchers also have their own different way of preparing for their starts and they do not often like changing their routine once they reach the States.

The other problem is that if the Yankees do decide they really want Darvish, they better be prepared for a posting fee that could approach $100 million and a contract of five years for upwards of $90 million. That is going to push the Yankees a lot further over the salary cap and managing partners Hank and Hal Steinbrenner have instructed Cashman to either hold it steady or reduce it where he can.

By signing Darvish the Yankees would have to have the Steinbrenners’ blessing to break the bank as they did in signing Mark Teixeira in 2009. This seems unlikely but certainly within the realm of possibilities.

But it is almost sure the Yankees will not sign both Wilson and Darvish. It will be one or the other.

ROY OSWALT

Oswalt is 34 and is coming off a 9-10 mark with a 3.69 ERA with the Phillies last season. He was injured for a month with some recurring back issues.

When he was healthy, he actually pitched quite well. He finished the season well by throwing quality starts in four of his last seven starts. The veteran right-hander is what the Yankees used to love: a reliable older veteran pitcher who has pitched in big playoff games and someone who definitely knows how to pitch.

The Yankees succeeded in signing veteran free agents like Jimmy Key, David Cone and Mike Mussina. However, at the other end of the spectrum they also have signed or traded for mistakes like Kevin Brown, Javier Vazquez and Burnett. So to be a little wary of Oswalt and his balky back might be another cautionary tale.

Insiders seem to believe that the Yankees interest in Oswalt is minimal at best, which would be fine by me. There may be too much mileage on that right arm to risk signing Oswalt at this stage of his career. There are much younger and cheaper options below him.

EDWIN JACKSON

At age 28, Jackson has already modeled six different uniforms and five in the last four seasons. The right-hander seems to burn bright with promise and then fizzle out like a dud roman candle.

Last season, Jackson was a combined 12-9 with a 3.79 ERA between the Chacago White Sox and the world champion St. Louis Cardinals. In fact, Jackson was 5-2 with a 3.58 ERA for the Cards in 12 starts down the stretch.

But he was 1-1 with a 5.80 ERA in his four postseason starts.

Jackson is one of those high-risk, high-reward free agents. He has the stuff and the stamina to dominate any team in baseball for nine innings. But he also can unravel like a cheap suit against the weakest hitting team in the league. Hence, his career ERA of 4.46 and a WHIP of 1.48.

The hope of signing Jackson is that he is young enough to turn his career around and become the star pitcher he was predicted in his younger days with the Los Angeles Dodgers. But you have to raise a red flag when a pitching coach like the esteemed Dave Duncan is willing to allow you to leave the Cardinals as a free agent.

Jackson would be much cheaper to sign than all the other pitchers listed above. But he also may be just a younger version of Burnett – some good days and a lot of bad ones. Pitching coach Larry Rothschild is not a young man. Why give him two potential heart attacks with Burnett and Jackson?

I do not see much interest in Jackson from the Yankees. Let him ruin another team’s staff.

MARK BUERHLE

He is 32 but he also is left-handed. So there is a lot to like in Buerhle.

Last season, Buerhle was 13-9 with a 3.59 ERA for the White Sox, the only organization he has ever known. In his 11 full seasons he is 161-119 with a 3.83 ERA.

Buerhle has never been a Josh Beckett, Roger Clemens or Stephen Strasburg pitcher who lights up radar guns. Buerhle just pitches and gets outs. He throws 200 innings every season and he not missed much time with injuries. He has no season in which he made less than 30 starts.

Reliability and effectiveness are two of Buerhle’s best descriptions. He also has been the unquestioned ace of this staff for all of those seasons and he has postseason experience. He was 2-0 with a 3.87 ERA in the championship season of 2005 for the White Sox.

This would be a perfect kind of target for the Yankees if they fail to sign or either Wilson or Darvish. He also could be a likely target if the Yankees intend to trade Burnett this winter, which has been circulating as a rumor ever since Cashman made the comment about “if Burnett is back with us next season.”

Buerhle is the antithesis of Burnett, Burnett has “stuff” but Buerhle gets by on guile. Buerhle is as steady as plane on autopilot. Burnett is be as unpredictable as Lindsay Lohan on Rodeo Drive.

It would stand to reason the Yankees might have an interest in another left-hander. If Wilson goes elsewhere, look for Buerhle to get an offer from the Yankees. Lefties fare much better in Yankee Stadium because teams stack righties and we all know the short porch is in right. So Mr. Buerhle certainly bears watching this winter.

He may just find a friendly home in the Bronx in 2012.

HIROKI KURODA

On the surface, Kuroda may appear to be better than Buerhle. After all, he was 13-16 but had a sparkling 3.07 ERA for the Dodgers in 2011.

However, Kuroda will be 37 when the 2012 season starts and he has pitched a lot of innings in Japan before he came to the Dodgers in 2008. He is 41-46 with a 3.45 ERA with the Dodgers.

The biggest drawback with Kuroda, besides his age, is the fact he has not pitched in the American League. So his value, much like Oswalt’s, may be inflated a bit by pitching in a less tougher league where pitchers bat.

His biggest positive for the Yankees is he is left-handed and the Yankees could use another lefty. He also is a low WHIP pitcher, His career WHIP is 1.19, which is excellent in any league.

But it is hard to imagine that the Yankees, who have been burned by National League pitchers like Brown and Vazquez before would not be salivating to add a 37-year-old Japanese pitcher who has not pitched in the American League.

The Yankees would have to be real desperate to show much interest in Kuroda.

TRADE OPTIONS

The biggest trade target the Yankees would seek would be Hernandez of the Mariners.

Why not?

Hernandez is only 25 and he is pitching for one of the weakest offensive teams in the A.L. He was 14-14 with a 3.47 ERA in 2011 and that was considered an off-year for the King.

He won the Cy Young Award in 2010 and is considered one of the best pitchers in baseball. So why wouldn’t the Yankees target him?

Well, Cashman has already weighed in on that subject by saying that he would much rather sign a pitcher as a free agent than trade away top-flight young players like Jesus Montero, Eduardo Nunez, Adam Warren, D.J. Mitchell, Delin Betances and Manny Banuelos.

The nice thing about signing a Wilson, Darvish or Buerhle is that Cashman still gets to keep the building blocks to the future of the club. Trading for Hernandez or any other pitcher like him would gut the farm system just as the Boston Red Sox have done by trading for Victor Martinez and Adrian Gonzalez the past two seasons.

Cashman would love to have King Felix in the fold. But not at the price the Mariners would want in return.

So do not bet the ranch Hernandez will be in pinstripes in 2012. It is just not likely to happen.

CONCLUSION

The bottom line is the Yankees are definitely targeting Wilson and Darvish. But they likely will sign only one of those two because they can’t afford both. Wilson tops the list because he is left-handed and he does not have the mileage most 31-year-old pitchers have on them.

But if Wilson eludes them or gets too pricey, Darvish will become priority No. 1 because he is not your typical Japanese import starting pitcher. Darvish has plus stuff and he has a competitive streak that makes him attack hitters without fear. The problem is it is hard to guarantee Cashman will even get a chance to negotiate with Arn Tellem, Darvish’s American agent.

The reason is the posting fee is a crapshoot. The Red Sox outbid other teams by more than $20 million in the Matsuzaka sweepstakes. Darvish is drawing interest from a lot of teams with bankrolls who can post $100 million. The Yankees just have to guess how high that fee might be and try to beat it if they want Darvish that badly.

Whatver money is left could possibly go to another pitcher if the Yankees are sure they want to ship Burnett out of town and they are willing to pay most, if not all, of his contract. If they do make that decision, Buerhle looks to be the most attractive target to replace Burnett.

A startung staff of Sabathia, either Darvish or Wilson, Buerhle, Hughes and Nova somehow does not seem so bad, does it?

Wilson, Darvish Top Yankees’ Winter Shopping List

With the disappointing loss to the Detroit Tigers in the American League Divisional Series a distant bad memory, the New York Yankees will look to reconstruct a championship caliber team for the 2012 season. To that end let’s look at what possible moves the Yankees might make to improve their roster. It might seem like a daunting task. But it sure could be worse. Think how tough a time the Boston Red Sox will have rebuilding without general manager Theo Epstein and manager Terry Francona.

PART 1 – Starting Pitching

PRIORITY NO. 3 – Finding help with free agents or trades

Looking at the New York Yankees’ starting rotation you have the possible loss of CC Sabathia, the return of injured right-hander Phil Hughes, the return of severely underperforming and overpaid right-hander A.J. Burnett, the sophomore season for rookie surprise Ivan Nova and the likely release of free agents Freddy Garcia and Bartolo Colon.

Even if Sabathia somehow decides to re-sign with the Yankees, they will still likely need another starter to add behind the ace left-hander and Hughes, Burnett and Nova. So that begs the question: Will general manager Brian Cashman be looking to spend big bucks to add another starter or two to the Yankees for the 2012 season?

That seems likely given that the Yankees were so hellbent on signing left-hander Cliff Lee last winter. But Lee spurned a better contract offer to sign for less money to pitch with the Philadelphia Phillies. Despite the fact Lee thought he was joining a super rotation of Roy Halladay, Cole Hamels and Roy Oswalt, the Phillies got no father than the Yankees did in the playoffs and Oswalt was allowed to become a free agent.

This season the Yankees obviously will be focused on getting Sabathia to remain in pinstripes. Sabathia has two days to decide to stay with the Yankees for the four years and $92 million left on his contract or opt out and look for a more lucrative deal. Most baseball insiders believe Sabathia, never being accused of being foolish, will opt out to seek a longer term on his contract and more money.

The Yankees, unlike their attitude when Alex Rodriguez opted out of his contract in 2008, are prepared to offer Sabathia a very lucrative six-year, $160 million contract modeled after the contract Lee signed with the Phillies. But Sabathia will have other suitors, including the Texas Rangers to increase the bidding price.

If the Yankees succeed in bringing Sabathia back into the fold, they will then turn their attention to acquiring a pitcher who they can slot in as a No. 2 or No. 3 starter.

TARGET NO. 1 – C.J. WILSON (16-7, 2.94 ERA)

Wilson is a 31-year-old left-hander who was the ace of the American League-champion Rangers. But unlike most 31-year-old starters, Wilson has only two seasons of throwing more than 200 innings behind him because he was a reliever in his previous five major-league seasons, all with the Rangers.

If the Yankees were to keep Sabathia and land Wilson it would a tremendous dual victory for the organization. They would have retained their ace and added a second left-hander to the rotation. In addition, it would be a double blow to the Rangers, who are not exactly swimming in starting pitchers who could pitch on the level of Sabathia and Wilson. Strengthening the Yankees while weakening the Rangers is a definite plus to a front office that is taken a great dislike in the Rangers’ front office over the past two years.

A rotation of Sabathia, Wilson, Hughes, Burnett and Nova does not sound all that bad when you add up their record from last season. That five (understanding that Hughes only pitched 74 2/3 innings) was a combined 67-35 with a 3.81 ERA.

Wilson will command a nice princely sum on the open market because he clearly is the best free-agent pitcher available this winter. In the past three season, the Yankees have not bid on pitchers like Halladay and John Lackey, preferring to either solve their problems from within or signing cheaper free agents like Colon and Garcia.

There is no doubt that Colon and Garcia helped the Yankees during the regular season. They were a liability at crunch time, however.

Colon was 6-4 with a 3.20 ERA and Garcia was 7-6 with a 3.13 ERA in the first half of the season. But in the second half, both pitchers struggled at times. Colon was 2-6 with a 4.96 ERA and Garcia was 5-2 with a 4.45 ERA. Colon pitched so badly he was not even placed on the active roster for the playoffs. Garcia pitched and lost Game 3 to the Tigers.

Neither Colon at age 38 or Garcia at age 35 figure to be back next season.

The Yankees also have a host of young pitching prospects like Manny Banuelos (20), Dellin Betances (23), David Phelps (25), D.J. Mitchell (24) and even Hector Noesi (24), who pitched out of the bullpen for the Yankees. Signing Wilson would give the Yankees an opportunity to bring those prospects along slowly. Banuelos and Betances are easily the most talented of the group and they could use a season at Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre to fine-tune their electric stuff.

Of course, some of them can be used in trades if Cashman felt a need to make a deal for a bench player or a veteran pitcher.

TARGET NO. 2 – YU DARVISH (18-6, 1.44 ERA for the Nippon Ham Fighters)

Darvish is a 25-year-old right-hander who stands 6-foot-5 and weights 187 pounds. He is the Randy Johnson of Japan with 276 strikeouts in 232 innings this season.

Even more impressive is that he is 88-33 in his last six seasons with his highest ERA during that period of 2.89 in 2006 when he was just 19.

Darvish has requested that his team owner post his contract in order to make himself available as free agent in the United States. Hokkaido Nippon Ham Fighters owner Hiroji Okoso indicated his readiness to respect Yu Darvish’s decision earlier this month even though the Japanese baseball season has not concluded.

Darvish’s posting will make the posting of Daisuke Matsuzaka in the winter of 2007 look like a flea-market sale. Darvish is a much more gifted pitcher who challenges hitters with his mid-90s fastball and he has some dazzling breaking stuff to go with it. Darvish has also succeeded on the grand stage, being named as the MVP of Japan’s victory in the last World Baseball Classic.

The Yankees, who have been burned in the past with the signings of Hideki Irabu and Kei Igawa, are nevertheless intrigued by Darvish. They have had a bevy of scouts in Japan clocking every fastball and monitoring the break on his curve. They see him as a potential ace in the major leagues.

But, if the Yankees are committed to re-signing Sabathia and they decide to make a long-term offer to Wilson, Darvish would be even out of reach of the Yankees deep pockets. The posting fee itself could be double the $100 million the Red Sox paid for Matsuzaka. Then the team that wins the posting must sign Darvish to a lucrative contract which might reach $150 million.

So it looks like Darvish would only come into the Yankees’ sights if they fail to keep Sabathia.

The Yankees would then have to pile their cash to sign Wilson and then offer a rich a posting fee to obtain the rights to sign Darvish. They could only afford that if Sabathia does not come back.

Darvish is Plan B if Sabathia leaves. If Sabathis stays, the Yankees likely will still look to sign Wilson and they will let Darvish go to another team with deep pockets like the Red Sox or Rangers.

TARGET NO. 3 – ROY OSWALT (9-10, 3.69 ERA)

Oswalt was injured in 2011 and he started only 23 games for the Phillies. He wasn’t bad as his ERA indicates.

But he also is 34 years old with 2,154 innings pitched in his major-league career. The Phillies chose to not keep him and he will be probably be the second-most sought after pitcher behind Wilson.

Oswalt is consummate pro with the ability to win at the major-league level with less stellar stuff then what he had in early days with Houston like 2005, when he was 20-12 with a 2.94 ERA and 184 strikeouts. Last season batters hit .280 off of him and he was forced to pitch out of a lot of jams.

Back issues forced him to miss all of July and he even considered retiring after this season. But he did throw four quality starts in his last seven appearances. But when it comes to signing Oswalt as a free agent, he is going to have to have doctors clear him to pitch in 2012 before he ever gets a contract offer.

The Yankees’ interest at this point of Oswalt’s career is unlikely. The Yankees would have to basically strike out on keeping Sabathia and signing either Wilson or Darvish before they would even consider making that move. Oswalt has pitched only in the National League and the Yankees have to be leery of guys like him and Javier Vazquez, who post low ERAs in the NL only to pitch with plus 5.00 ERAs in the American League.

Oswalt is the longest of longshots on the Yankees radar this winter. He has too much mileage, there are injury concerns and you have to consider he has not pitched in the AL.

TARGET NO. 4 – FELIX HERNANDEZ (14-14, 3.47 ERA)

With the Yankees, King Felix has been like Jonah’s whale. They try to reel him in but he slips through the nets every time.

Dealing with the Mariners in the past has not been pleasant. The Yankees attempted to deal for Lee when he was pitching for the Mariners in 2010. Mariners general manager Jack Zduriencik induced Cashman to include Jesus Montero and Ivan Nova in a potential deal for Lee.

The Rangers, on the other hand, were offering a package including power-hitting first baseman Justin Smoak.

Zduriencik then got greedy and asked the Yankees to sweeten the pot by including minor-league shortstop Eduardo Nunez to the package. Cashman said no and Zduriencik went running back to the Rangers to accept the Smoak package. The fact that Smoak bombed badly for the M’s in 2011 gives Yankee fans a lot of pleasure.

The Yankees, in the long run, were better off hanging onto Montero, Nova and Nunez and all three have bright futures ahead of them in pinstripes.

Any deal involving Hernandez likely will start with Zduriencik requesting Montero, Nunez and either Betances or Banuelos or both. This would the cost of doing business with a team that is desperate to fill the seats with a creditable team building for the future. But the Yankees would be crazy to be locked into this madness unless they were real desperate to replace Sabathia and they had lost both Wilson and Darvish in free agency.

This would be their Plan C and it would have to make sense to Cashman to give up so much talent. But Hernandez is not even 25 yet. So if you are going to deal for an ace it might as well be a young one with talent like the King.

But I do not see this happening. The M’s are building a nice rotation of young pitchers and Hernandez is a big part of that. However, their offense is just dreadful and King Felix could bring a package of young hitters the Mariners could build around. Montero would be a special prize here.

But the odds of it happening are in the 500-1 range. Cashman knows Zduriencik practices legal extortion and Cashman may be unwilling to pay up.

NEXT: PART 2 – Relief Pitching

PRIORITY NO. 1 – Finding a second left-hander or two

Yankees Have Jeter In Vise But It Could Haunt Them Later

I find all this Derek Jeter versus Yankee management haggling over money disturbing.
The reason is that the Yankees are the richest franchise in baseball and the most successful in the history of baseball and sports.
But for some reason Hank and Hal Steinbrenner and Brian Cashman have decided to play a little hardball with the team captain and the owner of five World Series rings.
Doesn’t that seem odd when you look at some of the recent history of this ballclub?
It was some years ago that this franchise offered Carl Pavano a four-year deal worth just a nickel below $40 million. The Return on Investment (ROI) there was just a shade below Yankee expectations. “Carla,” as Yankee fans called him, spent more time in a hot tub than Hugh Hefner and he needed a GPS device to find the Yankee Stadium mound.
Seems that the Cashman was the one who went looking for a Japanese lefty named Kei Igawa and signed him for about $50 million if you include the posting fee. Yankee fans remember him well. He marked his four seasons in pinstripes spending more time in Scranton than just about any salesman at Dunder-Mifflin. 
His appearances in the Bronx were just about as funny if they were not so sad. His plate offerings spent more time high and outside than Charlie Sheen.
So when the Yankees low-ball a good guy like Andy Pettitte as they did two years ago and they make it so obvious that they want Hideki Matsui and Johnny Damon off their payroll as they did last season, I begin to wonder.
Are the Yankees all about overpaying jerks and underpaying the “good soldiers?”
The Cashman tenure is littered with expensive free-agent mistakes and lavish contracts extended to stiffs who did not produce much.
Yet, the Yankees seem to have Jeter in a vise.
I would not want to be Jeter’s agent, Casey Close, right about now. The Yankees have closed off just about all avenues to Jeter’s former 10-year, $189 million deal being matched. They denied the shortstop arbitration, which Jeter could have leveraged into a one-year, $20 million contract.
They also tossed out a three-year, $45 million offer and basically invited Jeter to entertain offers from other clubs. If you were a GM of any of the other 29 major-league teams would you seriously offer Jeter a deal above that knowing it could be used to up the Yankees’ ante?
Therein, lies the rub.
The Yankees are betting that no club will offer Jeter anything more than three years and they are sure not many can afford the $20 million Jeter would like per season. This is old-fashioned country hardball negotiations and the Yankees seem to be sitting in the proverbial catbird seat.
Mariano Rivera is also part of this equation. Hence, the one-year offer he is getting when he is looking for two.
I get it. The fewer dollars spent on Jeter and Rivera the more dollars can lavished onto to ace left-hander Cliff Lee. I assume this is the real reason fiscal sanity has hit the Yankee top brass so suddenly.
But, this is a dangerous game. There could be something in the works that will throw a huge monkey wrench in the Yankees’ plan. This holds true especially for Rivera, who any team could claim with a reasonable two-year deal offer.
You want to begin the 2011 season with Joba Chamberlain as your closer?
With Rivera gone the Yankees could sign Cliff Lee to a $250 million deal and still lose about a half-dozen of his starts to a shaky bullpen. The same holds true for CC and the rest of the rotation. Sometimes you do not know what you are losing until you have lost it.
Jeter may be coming off his worst offensive season. But many wrote him off after a lackluster 2008 season. He came close to winning a Most Valuable Player in 2009. Do you really want to risk letting him having a bounceback season with the Detroit Tigers?
That is the kind of dangerous game the Yankee brass is playing with the face of the franchise.
I think of a season with Eduardo Nunez at shortstop. In some ways I think Nunez could be the Yankees’ shortstop for the next dozen years. He can hit, run and he is learning to field more consistently. Perhaps he is the future.
But when your clubhouse erodes into a powder keg of hurt egos and dissatisfied superstars grumbling to the media behind manager Joe Girardi’s back, I wonder what the Yankees will think of the $3.9 million dollars per season they tried to save signing Jeter.
Sometimes players earn respect for what they do for the team beyond statistics. One player in Baltimore comes to mind: Cal Ripken.
Look up Cal’s stats for the final five years of his career and you will wonder why he even got a contract offer at all from the Orioles. But ask the Orioles now if they could use another player like Ripken. Have they been the same since he retired?
That is what I see in Jeter. The same professionalism. The same quiet dignity. The desire to give it all for the team and leave it all out there on the field. The playing of the game the right way and playing each game as if it was the last.
Putting a price tag on that is hard. But it sure seems silly to throw it away to save a measly $3.9 million doesn’t it?

Twins Break Out Bats To Pummel Listless Yankees 11-0


GAME 5
TWINS 11, YANKEES 0

Minor-league outfielder Juan Portes hit two home runs on Sunday, including a grand slam, and drove in six runs as the Minnesota Twins blanked the New York Yankees 11-0 at Hammond Stadium in Fort Myers, FL.
Veteran left-hander Mike Maroth (1-0) earned the victory for the Twins and Chad Gaudin (0-1) took the loss. In their last three losses, the Yankees have surrendered 32 runs and scored eight.
The Twins are 2-3 this spring and the Yankees are 1-4 and they now have lost their last four contests.
YANKEE POSITIVES

  • There were no injuries and the Yankees’ bus made it safely back to Tampa.
  • For the first four games the starters have not been hitting or scoring runs. Against the Twins, the starters collected seven hits. But none of them were for extra bases and the first inning was the only inning they put together two consecutive hits. Unfortunately, those hits came with two outs and the third out was recorded before a run scored.
  • Jesus Montero doubled in the eighth inning and he is hitting .667 early in spring training.
  • Surprise! Sergio Mitre may be a pitcher to be reckoned with for the No. 5 spot. He pitched three scoreless innings as the day’s starter and gave up only a single to Joe Mauer (that’s to be expected) and a bunt single to Nick Punto. Mitre struck out two batters and walked one.
  • Robinson Cano had two hits in three at-bats and now is hitting a sizzling .714 this spring. So much for missing his buddy Melky Cabrera.
  • Brett Gardner led off the third inning with a beautifully executed bunt single. 
THE NEGATIVES

  • For the third consecutive game, the Yankees have had a pitcher melt down in one inning and turn a close game into a rout. Sunday’s loser du jour was Kei Igawa, who gave up four hits, a walk and uncorked a wild pitch. The damage: seven runs including that grand slam home run to Portes.
  • Chad Gaudin took a huge step backward after his impressive performance in last Wednesday’s Grapefruit League opener. He gave up a solo home run to first baseman Brock Peterson in the fourth inning and another solo home run to Jason Kubel in the sixth inning. He was tagged for three runs on three hits and a walk in two innings.
  • Right-hander D.J. Mitchell gave up three runs on four hits in one inning, including Portes’ second home run of the day — a two-shot to left field.
  • There was some sloppy play in the field too. In the fourth inning Chad Gaudin dropped a perfect flip from first baseman Mark Teixeira on a Jacque Jones’ grounder. In the fifth inning Ramiro Pena was charged with an error on a late throw to first on Brendan Harris’ grounder. However, Pena double-clutched the throw because Teixeira was late getting to the bag and Teixeira quickly indicated to Pena that it was his fault.
  • One caveat to Mitre’s outing: He only induced one groundout. The other five outs he recorded were in the air. Mitre as a sinkerball pitcher lives off groundouts. So maybe there was a bit of luck involved in this outing.
  • If you take the six runs the backups scored against the Tampa Bay Rays on Friday, the Yankees have been outscored 32-2 in the last three games. It may be early in the spring and it is great that the results of the games do not count, but I would suspect manager Joe Girardi would like to see some better pitching, a more robust offense and less sloppy play on the field.
DIAMOND NOTES

The Yankees brought four starters on the trip to Fort Myers: Brett Gardner, Nick Swisher (at DH), Mark Teixeira and Robinson Cano. . . . The Yankees drew a sellout crowd of 8,184 fans to Hammond Stadium. . . . The weather was excellent again. The game-time temperature was 66 and it was sunny with a slight wind blowing in from center field. . . . The Twins and their fans celebrated the 11-0 victory loudly. Perhaps it had something to do with the fact the Twins lost all six regular season games and were swept 3-0 in the American League Division Series by the Yankees. . . . There was no further update on catcher Francisco Cervelli, who suffered a concussion on Saturday when he was struck on the batting helmet in a game against the Toronto Blue Jays. A CT scan on Saturday was negative but as a precaution Cervelli is scheduled to see a neurologist on Monday. Barring any complications, Cervelli hopes to be back out on the field in a couple of days. He told reporters he was feeling OK. . . . Andy Pettitte stayed behind in Tampa to throw a two-inning simulated game. He is scheduled to make his first spring start on Saturday against the Washington Nationals in Viera, FL. 
THE NEXT GAME

The Yankees will participate in split squad games on Monday. One team will head to Brandenton, FL, to play the Pittsburgh Pirates at 1:05 p.m. EST. Alfredo Aceves, another candidate for the No. 5 starter spot, will make his second spring appearance for the Yankees. He will face the Pirates’ left-hander Paul Maholm.
Meanwhile, the Yankees will play host to the Philadelphia Phillies. Javier Vazquez, the right-hander acquired from the Braves, will make his spring debut for the Yankees. He will be opposed by right-hander Kyle Kendrick.
The game at George M. Steinbrenner Field will be televised by YES Network and the MLB Network. Game time is 1:05 p.m. EST.

Rays Pound Weakened Joba For 12-7 Victory Over Yankees



GAME 3
RAYS 12, YANKEES 7

TAMPA, FL – Sean Rodriguez was 3-for-3, including a double, a triple and a home run, and drove in three runs and Jason Bartlett added another two hits and three RBIs as the Tampa Bay Rays beat the New York Yankees 12-7 in a slugfest at Steinbrenner Field on Friday.
Joba Chamberlain, showing the effects of rustiness and weakened by the flu, was tagged for three hits, issued three walks and surrendered five runs in 1 1/3 innings. His main competition for the No. 5 spot in the rotation, Phil Hughes, gave up one run in his two innings of work and he took the loss.
Rays’ starter David Price pitched 1 2/3 scoreless innings and he was credited with the victory.
The Yankees are now 1-2 on the spring and the Rays are 2-1.
YANKEE POSITIVES

  • There were no injuries to report.
  • Francisco Cervelli was 2-for-2, including a leadoff triple in the third in which he dared left fielder Rodriguez to throw him out at third and he slid in safely. Unfortunately, he did not score because Derek Jeter struck out, Curtis Granderson bounced out to the pitcher and Mark Teixeira struck out.
  • Robinson Cano also was 2-for-2 with a double and a single — both hits came off left-handers.
  • After the Yankees fell behind 7-0 and were trailing 8-1 in the bottom of the seventh, the reserves battled back to score six runs off Rays’ pitchers Mike Ekstrom and R.J. Swindle.
  • Eduardo Nunez, Juan Miranda, Kevin Russo and Jorge Vazquez keyed the seventh inning rally with RBI doubles.
  • You know it is a bad day when the most impressive Yankees pitcher was Kei Igawa. The Japanese lefty entered the game in the fourth inning with the bases loaded and one out and the Yankees were trailing 7-0. Igawa ended the threat by striking out Ben Zobrist and inducing B.J. Upton to pop out to Jeter. He then pitched a perfect fifth inning. He faced five batters in all and retired them all on 21 pitches. 
  • Hughes did not pitch poorly. He did give up a home run to Rodriguez in the first but he showed good command of his change-up, a pitch he is adding to his arsenal this season.
THE NEGATIVES

  • Chamberlain was obviously not himself. His delivery was sound but he left too many pitches up in the strike zone and the three walks are a clear indication his command was just not there. He told reporters after the game “You’re not going to win the battle by one game.” Chamberlain had spent most of the previous two days in bed and he said he had lost eight pounds. He said it was important for him to pitch and get his work in and he is not too concerned with the results.
  • It is early in the spring but some of the regular starters are off to slow starts. Curtis Granderson, Mark Teixeira, Jorge Posada and Nick Swisher are hitless.
  • Kevin Whelan, who was acquired in the Gary Sheffield trade, made Chamberlain’s outing worse by failing to retire a batter in the fourth inning. He entered the game with runners on second and third and one out. He then, in succession, threw a wild pitch to allow one run to score, walked a batter, gave up a two-run single to Bartlett, a double to Rodriguez and walked Evan Longoria before he was yanked by pitching coach Dave Eiland.
  • After the Yankees had rallied to an 8-7 deficit in the seventh, Grant Duff entered the game  in the eighth and promptly gave up three runs on two hits and two walks.
  • Yankee pitchers combined to issue 10 walks to the Rays and six of them later scored runs. The staff also uncorked two wild pitches.
  • An unearned run also scored in the seventh inning on a throwing error by Nunez.
DIAMOND NOTES

The weather for Friday’s game was a marked improvement from the past two days. The temperature at game time was 57 degrees. It was mostly sunny with only a slight 5 mph breeze towards right field. . . . The better weather also improved the attendance. The announced crowd was 10,753. . . . As expected, Nick Johnson did not play due to a strained lower back. Manager Joe Girardi said Johnson likely will not play again until Monday. Johnson suffered the injury in Clearwater on Thursday when his spikes caught in a turf mat near the batting cage. Johnson mistakenly thought he would be taking grounders after completing batting practice. But, as the DH that day, he was not required to take grounders and only needed to wear his rubber-souled shoes in the batting cage.  . . . Derek Jeter robbed his counterpart Jason Bartlett of a hit in the first inning with an impressive pickup of a line drive on the short hop, a spin and a long throw to first from the outfield grass that beat Bartlett. Many Rays players felt that Bartlett and not Jeter should have won the Gold Glove at shortstop in the American League last season. . . . Nick Swisher was a bit embarrassed after a base-running blunder in the second inning. Catcher Dioner Navarro attempted to pick him off first base with Francisco Cervelli at the plate but Swisher narrowly got back to the bag. But on the next pitch Navarro gunned him down easily and it ended a two-on, two-out threat. . . .  Girardi said he will not make up his mind concerning a No. 5 starter until about March 25 so Joba Chamberlain will have plenty of chances to prove he deserves the job. . . . In the crowd at the game was former Yankee farmhand and Rays first baseman Fred McGriff. The Tampa native assists the Rays on a part-time basis. 
THE NEXT GAME

The Yankees will host the Toronto Blue Jays at George M. Steinbrenner Field on Saturday. A.J. Burnett, a former Blue Jay, will make his first start of the spring for the Yankees. His former teammate, Shaun Marcum will get the starting assignment for the Blue Jays.
Game time is 1:05 p.m. EST and the game will be telecast locally by WWOR (My 9) and nationally by the MLB Network.

Yankees Should Get Boost From Minor Leaguers

COMMENTARY



The New York Yankees’ roster is about to get a huge boost that will make the team with the best record in the major leagues even stronger.
No, the Yankees are not adding Roy Halladay or Lance Berkman.
They will be able to add players from the Triple-A Scranton-Wilkes Barre on Sept. 1 when major-league rules allow teams to expand their rosters to 40 players. While it is doubtful the Yankees will add 15 additional players they will be able to add a few key pieces that will strengthen the club down the stretch.
The No. 1 key piece to the Yankees’ September push will be catcher Francisco Cervelli, who performed so ably as the starting catcher when both Jorge Posada and Jose Molina suffered leg injuries earlier in the season.
Cervelli hit .269 in 78 at-bats with one home run and nine RBIs. But where he really impressed manager Joe Girardi, a former catcher himself, was on defense and handling a veteran pitching staff. The starters all agreed that Cervelli showed he could call a good game and help them with his defense.
On July 8, the Yankees activated Molina form the 15-day disabled list and optioned Cervelli to Scranton. However, that was a promotion for Cervelli because he was recalled from Double-A Trenton, where he was hitting a paltry .190. At Scranton, Cervelli is hitting .246. So the fact he hit .269 for the Yankees still is a surprise.
The main value Cervelli has now is allowing the Yankees more flexibility with Jorge Posada nursing a bruised left ring finger. Posada said the injury likely will linger through the rest of the season.
A third catcher will allow Girardi to replace Posada with Molina more often knowing that Cervelli is available to catch if a pinch-hitter is needed for Molina. Girardi also could use Posada as a DH knowing Cervelli could backup Molina without having Girardi lose the DH spot by using Posada behind the plate.
A second player the Yankees would love to have back is Ramiro Pena. The reserve infielder hit .277 in 94 at-bats during two previous stints with the Yankees. But he drew praise from Girardi for his defensive work in the infield.
Pena is a slick fielder who also has ability to run the bases. So he immediately will help Jerry Hairston as an infield reserve and provide a potential pinch-runner with an ability to steal bases. Pena has two steals with the Yankees and five for Scranton.
Speaking of steals, the Yankees also hope to have Brett Gardner back on the roster by mid-September. Gardner was the team leader in stolen bases when he broke his left thumb on July 26
Gardner was hitting .275 and playing sparkling defense in centerfield. His absence has robbed the Yankees of their best base stealer and also has forced Melky Cabrera to play every day in centerfield, which has affected his batting average.
Cabrera was hitting .285 on July 26 and now is hitting .268. Gardner’s return will allow Girardi to use him to rest Cabrera in center, to enter the game as a late-inning defensive replacement or to be used a pinch-runner in close games.
The Yankees also will be able to call up right-hand relief pitchers Jonathan Albaladejo and Mark Melancon. Both pitchers pitched out of the bullpen earlier in the season.
In nine appearances, Melancon was 0-1 with a 3.18 ERA. Albaladejo was 4-1 with a 5.61 ERA in 22 appearances. Both pitchers will give Girardi an opportunity to use them in order to rest the key members of the bullpen with the playoffs looming.
Girardi and pitching coach Dave Eiland want the bullpen fine-tuned for the post-season but not overworked. Melancon and Albaladejo can help in that regard. 
Melancon is 4-0 with a 2.89 ERA and three saves at Scranton. Albaladejo is 3-0 with a 1.54 ERA and leads Scranton in saves with 11. 
Other players the Yankees might call up are infielder-outfielder Shelley Duncan, who leads the International League in home runs with 29. Duncan has always been a popular player in the Bronx and he could help the Yankees as a right-hand power threat off the bench.
Young right-hand reliever Anthony Claggett also could be recalled. He is on the 40-man roster and he could be added to the bullpen mix.
Players you definitely will not see include left-hander Kei Igawa, who has Brian Cashman counting the days until the end of his four-year deal. Igawa will likely never toe the rubber at Yankee Stadium again and Yankee fans are counting their blessings for that.
Reserve infielder Cody Ransom accepted assignment to Scranton after he cleared waivers but the Yankees do not seem to need Ransom at all with Hairston on the roster and Pena available to call up.
No. 1 minor-league prospect Austin Jackson likely won’t get a chance either. Jackson, who is hitting .294 with four home runs and 57 RBIs and 22 steals at Scranton, will not be called up this season because the Yankees have so many options in the outfield that Jackson would not play enough to make it worthwhile to recall him.

Some Random Thoughts

COMMENTARY


Before the national broadcast Here a few thoughts about the Yankees I want to share:
  • I like the deal that brought Jerry Hairston to the team from the Reds. He can play every position in the field except catcher and pitcher but he also provides another base-stealing threat off the bench. Defensively, he is also very steady.
  • If the Yankees do plan to change Joba Chamberlain’s role than they are going to have to bite the bullet and acquire a frontline starter. I can’t see why with CC Sabathia’s inconsistency, Chien-Ming Wang’s loss for the season and the fact Sergio Mitre has no business pitching on a major-league roster, that you even entertain the thought of shutting Chamberlain down now. 
  • Something is definitely wrong with Alfredo Aceves. After his horrific outing in Oakland last Saturday, he followed it up with another disastrous outing in Chicago on Friday night. Pitching through pain and discomfort is not heroic. It makes the team vulnerable. If he is hurt, the Yankees need to shut him down now.
  • If Sergio Mitre pitches again for the Yankees again I am going to scream. It is obvious to me as it must be to the manager Joe Girardi and pitching coach Dave Eiland that he has no control of his sinker and none of his other pitches are that great. I thought I was watching early season videotape of Chien-Ming Wang. He’s got to go.
  • There is not much available to the Yankees to replace Mitre at the minor-league level. Ian Kennedy is unavailable because he had to undergo surgery for an aneurysm in his pitching shoulder. That leaves our old friend (and I use the term loosely) Kei Igawa and former major-league flops Josh Towers and Casey Fossum. No one at the Double-A level looks ready either. Perhaps Cashman may not have wanted to pay the price by the trade deadline. He may have to now.
  • Eric Hinske needs to play more. I do not understand the Yankees reluctance to use him at first or third base. He came up as an infielder and he looks merely adequate in right field. I would much rather see him play than Cody Ransom.
  • Speaking of Ransom. He got a reprieve today when the Yankees put Jerry Hairston on the roster. The Yankees Likely will have to send Shelley Duncan back to Triple-A despite after just one day on the roster. Duncan has 25 home runs at Scranton-Wilkes Barre and never complained when he was sent down after a solid spring. Duncan is just a great player to have on a team.
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