Results tagged ‘ Craig Stammen ’

Young’s Homer Boosts Yankees Past Nationals



Chris Young blasted a two-run homer in the eighth inning off Nationals closer Drew Storen to propel New York to a come-from-behind victory over Washington on Saturday at Nationals Park in Washington, D.C.

Young’s third home run of the spring, which all came off the Nationals, followed a one-out single by Didi Gregorius.

Storen (0-1), who has been hampered all spring with blister on his right foot, took the loss.

David Carpenter (2-0) pitched one-third of an inning in the seventh to get credit for the victory. Right-hander Dellin Betances earned a save by striking out the side in the ninth despite making things interesting by yielding a single and a walk in between.

The Yankees concluded their exhibition season with a 17-16-1 record.


Chris Martin pitched a perfect inning of relief in sixth with two strikeouts. Just the fact he is even pitching on a major-league roster is a miracle in and of itself.

Martin was named a member of manager Joe Girardi’s seven-man bullpen on Friday. But there was a time the 6-foot-8 right-hander was just a regular working stiff at an appliance warehouse.

Down in Arlington, TX, Martin was loading 650-pound refrigerators onto dollies for delivery. The only doubleheaders Martin knew were the shifts he previously worked at the lawn and garden section at Lowe’s warehouse and then evenings at UPS.

Before all this Martin, 27, was drafted as a senior from Arlington High School by the Detroit Tigers in 18th round of the 2004 First-Year Player Draft. Instead of signing Martin opted to attend McLennan Community College in Waco, TX.

That following year, the tall right-hander was chosen in the 21st round by the Colorado Rockies. Again, Martin opted to stay in school.

However, that fall, Martin severely injured his shoulder. On the advice of Dr. Keith Meister, the team physician for the Texas Rangers, Martin tried resting the shoulder. But with the pain too great, Martin underwent surgery in 2007 to repair the labrum and release the shoulder capsule.

When the shoulder healed, Martin tried out with the Fort Worth Cats of the United Baseball League. When the shoulder still didn’t feel right, Martin quit baseball and went to work at Lowe’s and then at night with UPS for the insurance benefits.

Martin later caught up with former Arlington alum Jordan Bostwick, who graduated a year after Martin. Bostwick urged Martin to come to work for him at Texas Appliance in Arlington.

In June 2010, Bostwick broke out a left-handed catcher’s mitt during a lunch break and had Martin play catch with him. Martin’s pitches busted the seams off the mitt and nearly broke Bostwick’s right thumb.

More importantly, Martin informed Bostwick his shoulder felt really good.

Soon Martin signed a contract for $800 a month with the Grand Prairie Airhogs, an independent team operated by former major-league slugger Pete Incaviglia.

The radar readings of Marin’s pitches were hitting 95 miles per hour. Martin went on to a 4-0 record with a 1.95 ERA in 13 games with the Airhogs.

Incaviglia called the Boston Red Sox on behalf of Martin and the Red Sox signed him for $1,100 a month after a tryout arranged at Martin’s expense in Fort Myers, FL. After stops in Class-A Greenville and Salem, Double-A Portland and Triple-A Pawtucket, Martin was dealt to the Rockies in December 2013.

Martin made his major-league debut with the Rockies against the Los Angeles Dodgers on April 26 of last year.

He ended up with an ERA of 6.89 in 16 games with the Rockies before his contract was purchased for $75,000 by the Yankees in January.

Martin was among a large group of non-roster pitchers trying to making the Yankees’ bullpen this spring. At best, he was a long-shot. He ended spring training on Saturday with a 0-1 record and 4.09 ERA in 11 appearances. But the Yankees were enamored more by his 18 strikeouts with only one walk.

So Martin now will have a chance to open the season in the major leagues in 2015. It does not appear he will be making those shifts to load refrigerators in Texas anymore.

Instead he will be living out a dream that looked to be over just a short time ago.


  • Despite the fact starter Nathan Eovaldi gave up three runs on three hits in the first inning, he settled in nicely afterwards. Eovaldi, 25, held the Nats to just one hit over the next four frames. In five innings, Eovaldi struck out six while walking three. He ended his spring with a 1-1 record with a 1.93 ERA and 20 strikeouts in 18 2/3 innings.
  • Stephen Drew ruined right-hander Doug Fister’s six-inning outing by lashing a two-out, two-run home run in the fifth inning to draw the Yankees to within a run of the Nationals at 3-2. It was Drew’s third homer of the spring and he ended up batting .259 with three homers and nine RBIs. On March 12, Drew was hitting .077. From then on he was 16-for-34 (.471).
  • Betances earned a save by striking out the side in the ninth. But he also yielded a one-out single to Reed Johnson and a one-out walk to Pedro Severino. Betances topped out at 95 mph on the radar gun, which is still a bit off the 97 mph he was throwing at last season.


  • The offense is still pretty inconsistent. The Yankees did not get their first hit until the fourth inning and they managed just six hits overall. Fortunately, home runs by Drew and Young bailed them out. The Yankees got great pitching from Masahiro Tanaka, Michael Pineda, Eovaldi and Adam Warren this spring. It would a shame not to give those guys the support they deserve.
  • Alex Rodriguez started at designated hitter and batted seventh in the game. But A-Rod probably would like to forget about it because Fister fanned him twice and reliever Craig Stammen did it once  –  all three strikeouts came on sharp curveballs.
  • Jacoby Ellsbury and Brett Gardner set the table exactly as Girardi would have liked in the fourth when Ellsbury reached after being hit by a pitch from Fister. Gardner followed with a sharp single to left. But Carlos Beltran grounded into a force play and Mark Teixiera rapped into a 4-6-3 double play. The RBI guys are paid to produce and Beltran and Teixeira must do it consistently if the Yankees are to contend at all.


The Yankees elected to retain John Ryan Murphy as their backup catcher to Brian McCann as they designated for assignment Austin Romine on Saturday. Murphy came off the bench in seventh inning to catch and was 0-for-1 to end the spring with a .238 average. Romine was 6-for-35 (.171) with 10 strikeouts. Romine was out of options so now any team may claim him. If he is not claimed he would remain with the Yankees and be sent to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.  . . .  In other roster moves, the Yankees added backup infielder Gregorio Petit to the 25-man roster and they placed infielder Brendan Ryan (calf strain), left-hander Chris Capuano (quad strain) and right-hander Ivan Nova (Tommy John surgery) on the 15-day disabled list. Infielder Jose Pirela was placed on the 7-day concussion DL.


The Yankees will rest on Sunday and prepare to open the season on Monday at Yankee Stadium against the Toronto Blue Jays.

Tanaka, 26, will start for the Yankees after ending up 1-2 with a 3.07 ERA in four spring starts. It is the first time since 2008 that a pitcher other than CC Sabathia has started the season for the Yankees.

Right-hander Drew Hutchison will pitch for the Blue Jays. Hutchison, 24, was 3-0 with a 1.50 ERA in four spring outings. He surprisingly won the starting assignment over former Cy Young Award winner R.A. Dickey and veteran left-hander Mark Buehrle.

Game-time will be 1:05 p.m. EDT and the game will be broadcast nationally by ESPN and locally by the YES Network.


Nats Rally For 3 Runs In Seventh To Nip Yankees



Jose Lobaton stroked a one-out, two-run double in the seventh inning off right-hander Kyle Davies to cap a three-run rally that gave Washington a victory over New York on Monday at Space Coast Stadium in Viera, FL.

The Yankees blew leads of 3-0 and 6-4 during the afternoon as the result of some shaky pitching from Chasen Shreve, Jose Ramirez and Davies.

Five of the Yankees’ runs came as the result of home runs by Chris Young and Brian McCann.

McCann capped a three-run inning in the third by connecting for a two-run home run off starter Doug Fister.  It was his second home run of the spring.

After the Nationals took the lead with four runs in the fourth inning, Young tied the game in the fifth with his first home run of the spring, which also came off Fister.

In the sixth inning, Young connected again for a two-run shot to left off right-hander Casey Janssen.

Right-hander Craig Stammen (1-0) pitched a perfect seventh inning to get credit for the victory. Veteran right-hander Heath Bell earned a save. Davies (0-1) took the loss.

The Yankees have now lost their last two road contests and their Grapefruit League record fell to 12-9.


In his first full season with the Arizona Diamondbacks, Young was considered one of the best young power hitters in the game after he hit 32 homers in 2007. He also stole 27 bases that season so the D-backs were thrilled to have a young player who could combine power and speed.

However, as the seasons wore on in the Arizona desert, Young could not get his batting average over the .257 he hit in 2010. The strikeouts also hovered around 140 per season and after a injury-marred season in 2012, Young was sent packing to Oakland.

After hitting .200 with 12 homers and 40 RBIs for the Athletics. Young ended up with the Mets. Met fans soon unleashed a chorus of boos at him when he hit .205 with eight home runs and 28 RBIs in 88 games.

Young found himself without a job at midseason until the Yankees called and asked him to audition for a job with them in the final month. Young responded by hitting three home runs and driving in 10 runs in just 23 games. More noteworthy, Young batted .282.

The Yankees decided to keep Young and he has already been named as the team’s fourth outfielder. Capable of playing all three outfield spots, Young provides insurance to the Yankees should center-fielder Jacoby Ellsbury been unable to recover from an oblique injury enough to play Opening Day.

He also can spell 37-year-old right-fielder Carlos Beltran, who is coming off an injury-plagued 2014 season.

Young proved what he is capable of at Space Coast Stadium on Monday. Two at-bats in consecutive innings and two home runs. Young is now batting .265 with two home runs and four RBIs but his value is much more than those numbers.

The Yankees need his power from the right side of the plate. He provides some speed to the lineup and he is also above-average fielder. At age 31, Young may have a role suited for him and the Yankees.

It looks like it will be beneficial to both.


  • Starter Bryan Mitchell looked pretty good in his outing against the Nationals. He yielded two runs on four hits and two walks while striking out two in 3 1/3 innings. Mitchell actually was not on the mound when those two runs scored. Shreve allowed a two-out, bases-loaded single to the pitcher Fister in the fourth inning. He is still a longshot to be the team’s fifth starter, but Mitchell, 25, might be a valuable fill-in starter should the Yankees need to call him up from Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.
  • McCann is showing that he has got his timing down at the plate. In his past four games, McCann is 5-for-10 (.500) with two homers and five RBIs. McCann, 31, will likely bat fifth in the Yankee lineup and he will be expected to hit for power and drive in runs. McCann also would like to hit better than the .232 average he ended up with in 2014.
  • Rob Refsnyder is showing that batting over .300 at Triple-A last season was not a fluke. He was 2-for-2 on Monday including a lined double off Fister and he scored two runs. Refsynder, who will turn 24 on March 26, is batting .346 this spring. The converted second baseman is still working on his defense but he can flat-out hit.


  • Shreve stinks, period. In three consecutive outings the 24-year-old left-hander has yielded six runs (five earned) on seven hits in just two innings. There had been talk that Shreve possibly would join Andrew Miller and Justin Wilson as a third lefty in the bullpen. After Monday, it is safe to say that Shreve will be back at Scranton trying to figure out what went wrong and how he can fix it.
  • Davies, 31, was once a potential fifth starter candidate but he likely will not make the team at all. The non-roster right-hander has not pitched in the majors since 2011, when he was 1-9 with a 6.75 ERA with the Kansas City Royals. This spring he is 0-1 with 5.14 ERA and he did himself no favors giving up three runs on three hits and a walk in the seventh inning to the Nationals.


Ellsbury, 31, told reporters that his strained right oblique is feeling better and he still believes that he can be ready to play on Opening Day. Ellsbury has not played in an exhibition game since March 15 when he felt a twinge throwing in the outfield before a game with the Philadelphia Phillies. “I guess all I can tell is just how I feel each and every day,” Ellsbury told reporters. “But until I swing a bat, until I throw, until I do really explosive stuff, that will be the real test. But it does feel better each and every day.”  . . .  Manager Joe Girardi said on Monday that infielder Jose Pirela was still feeling some neck soreness but was no longer feeling dizzy. Pirelli, 25, crashed into the wall at Tradition Field in Port St. Lucie, FL, in the first inning of a game against the Mets. Pirelli left the game and he will undergo a concussion protocol. It is unclear when he will be able to return to action. Pirela is batting .370 this spring with no home runs and five RBIs.


The Yankees return to George M. Steinbrenner Field in Tampa, FL, to host the Detroit Tigers on Tuesday.

Right-hander Esmil Rogers will have likely his last shot to claim the No. starting spot in the Yankee rotation. Rogers, 29, is 0-0 with a 2.89 ERA in five appearances (three starts) this spring.

The Tigers will start right-hander Anibal Sanchez, who is 0-0 with a 4.05 ERA in four spring starts. But he is coming off five shutout innings in his last start.

Game-time will be 7:05 p.m. EDT and the game will be broadcast nationally by the MLB Network and locally by the YES Network.


Laird’s Walk-Off Sac Fly In 10th Boosts Yankees


YANKEES 4, NATIONALS 3 (10 Innings)

TAMPA – When you have a team struggling to get on base and score runs it is never too late push a run across – even if it is the 10th inning.

Brandon Laird lofted a sacrifice fly in the 10th inning to score Justin Maxwell with the game-winning run as New York swept it two-game home-and-away set with Washington at George M. Steinbrenner Field on Friday.

The Yankees, very much like Scarlett O’Hara in “Gone With the Wind,” depended greatly on “the kindness of strangers.”

Nationals right-hander Atahualpa Severino started his stint in the 10th by walking Maxwell. Pinch-hitter Melky Mesa followed by hitting a routine grounder that was misplayed by Nationals third baseman Mark Teahen, allowing Maxwell to advance to third. One out later, Laird launched a fly ball to right field that plated Maxwell with the deciding tally.

Right-hander Chase Whitley (1-0) pitched a scoreless top of the 10th to gain credit for the victory. Severino (0-1) took the loss.

The game featured a matchup of lefties in CC Sabathia for the Yankees and newly acquired Gio Gonzalez for the Nationals. However, Sabathia struggled with his command and he left after just three innings on the south end of a 3-1 deficit.

Sabathia gave up three runs on six hits and a walk while he fanned two. Gonzalez gave up a run on three hits and three walks and struck out six in 3 1/3 innings.

The Yankees managed to tie the game in the fifth inning off reliever Craig Stammen on a leadoff single by Doug Bernier and a two-out, two-run home run to deep left by Alex Rodriguez, his first home run this spring since he homered on the first pitch he saw by Roy Halladay of the Phillies on March 3.

With the victory the Yankees improved their spring record to 7-8. The Nationals fell to 5-7.


  • With the battle of lefties going on most of the buzz in the sellout crowd of 10,982 was about another left-hander entirely. The news 39-year-old Andy Pettitte had elected to come out of retirement and sign a $2.5 million minor-league contract with the Yankees spread like wildfire through the Yankee faithful on hand. I would consider adding a pitcher to your roster who has 240 major-league victories (203 of them with the Yankees) has got to be considered a positive development.
  • Though the Yankee regulars struck out so much they could have put out a wildfire, it was nice to see Rodriguez connect for a huge two-run home run in the fifth inning. The Yankees, if you can believe this, have only hit a total of five home runs in the first 15 games this spring. Hopefully, this may signal an end to the power outage.
  • Though Sabathia struggled, Phil Hughes turned in a very sharp four innings of work in relief. Hughes, who is still competing with a group of pitchers that now will include Pettitte for a starting spot, held the Nationals scoreless on three hits, did not walk a batter and he struck three. Hughes is showing no signs of the right shoulder fatigue that plagued him last season.
  • Robinson Cano doubled to the opposite field in the first inning off Gonzalez to score Curtis Granderson from first base to draw the Yankees to within a run at 2-1. Cano is off to a very slow start this spring and is hitting .190.


  • Sabathia admitted after the game his fastball was “all over the place” and it cost him early. The Nationals loaded the bases to start the game on a double, single and a walk. They pushed across a run on a double-play grounder off the bat of Wilson Ramos. But they added a second run in the same frame on an RBI double by Jesus Flores. Steve Lombardozzi then touched Sabathia with a leadoff home run in the third inning to give the Nationals a 3-1 lead.
  • Strikeouts, strikeouts, strikeouts. The Yankees struck out 14 times in the game. Raul Ibanez, Francisco Cervelli and Bill Hall fanned two times each. Considering the fact that the Yankees won the game after collecting just five hits in the game you would have to say they were lucky to have won at all. The pitching of Hughes was the big key. The question is when are the Yankees going to wake up and start hitting?
  • Ibanez was 0-for-2 with a walk and fanned twice and he is now hitting .077. Yankee fans are getting a bit impatient with Ibanez considering he is replacing retired Yankee icon Jorge Posada at designated hitter and because the Yankees chose to sign him instead of a pair of former popular Yankees in Johnny Damon and Hideki Matsui.


Injuries have cropped up all over the place and it is now an epidemic in Yankee camp. Derek Jeter missed the game Friday and will not play again until Tuesday due to a tender left calf. The Yankees were quick to point out that they do not consider the injury serious and that is not the same calf that forced Jeter to the disabled list for three weeks last season.  . . .  Meanwhile, Nick Swisher and Russell Martin were held out of action with strained left groins. Swisher could return to the lineup on Saturday but Martin will be shelved for a couple of days.  . . .  Those walking wounded join the ranks of Eduardo Nunez (bruised right hand), Ramiro Pena (sprained right ankle) and David Robertson (bone bruise of right foot) who are also out of action.  . . .  The Yankees made their first cuts of the spring on Friday, re-assigning 14 players to minor-league camp, including top pitching prospect Manny Banuelos. Banuelos was among seven pitchers sent out. The others were Dan Burawa, Brett Marshall, Adam Miller, Ryan Pope, Graham Stoneburner and Whitley. The other cuts included catchers Gary Sanchez, J.R. Murphy and Kyle Higashioka, infielders David Adams and Corban Joseph and outfielders Zoilo Almonte and Mesa.


The Yankees will host the Houston Astros for the second time this spring on Saturday at George M. Steinbrenner Field.

Scheduled to start for the Yankees will be 37-year-old right-hander Hiroki Kuroda, who will be making his third start of the spring. Kuroda is 0-1 with a 5.40 ERA and he was displeased with his last start.

The Astros are expected to start right-hander Bud Norris.

Game-time will be 1:05 p.m. EDT and the game will be telecast nationally by the MLB Network and locally by the YES Network.


Despite 8-Run Fourth, CC And Yankees Lose To Nationals

TAMPA — 42-year-old journeyman Matt Stairs laced a pinch-hit ground-rule double to tie the game and Bradley Suttle’s fielding error on Kevin Barker’s grounder allowed the lead run to score in the top of the seventh inning as Washington downed New York at George M. Steinbrenner Field on Saturday.
The Nationals actually pounded Yankee starter CC Sabathia and Joba Chamberlain for eight hits and four walks in 3 2/3 innings to take a 7-0 lead. However, former Yankee Chad Gaudin and reliever Josh Wilkie gave up six hits and one walk to allow the Yankees to come back to take an 8-7 lead in the bottom of the fourth inning.
But the Yankees could not hold it.
Daniel Turpen (0-1) was tagged with the loss. Craig Stammen (2-0) pitched two scoreless innings for the victory and Adam Carr pitched a 1-2-3 ninth to earn a save.
The Yankees dropped to 2-5-1 on the spring and the Nationals improved to 4-2.
  • Jorge Vazquez continued his fine hitting this spring with two hits in the game, including a big two-run double in the fourth inning off Wilkie that tied the score at 7-7. Vazquez is hitting a robust .583 with two homers and five RBIs.
  • Brett Gardner started the fourth inning off with a ground-rule double to left and scored on a fielding error by Brian Bixler. He then laced a one-out triple to right in the same inning to drive in Vazquez with the lead run to make it 8-7. 
  • Jesus Montero, who is now the frontrunner to back up Russell Martin at catcher, added two hits and an RBI to raise his spring average to .273.
  • With the Yankee pitchers giving up 10 runs it is hard to single out a pitcher, but left-hander Robert Fish pitched two solid innings of scoreless relief after the Yankees took their 8-7 lead. 
  • Sabathia could not locate his fastball and he paid for it dearly. He faced 15 batters and gave up six hits (including two doubles and home run), walked two and struck out one. He threw 53 pitches and 25 of them were balls. Sabathia told reporters after the game, “I just didn’t have it today.” 
  • Sabathia has now given up exactly five runs in his second start of the spring in three consecutive seasons with the Yankees. 
  • Chamberlain was not much better. After ending the third inning in relief of Sabathia, Chamberlain gave up two runs on two hits and two walks. 
  • Turpen gave up two doubles and hit a batter but was not helped by Suttle’s error that allowed the tie-breaking run to score.
  • The Nationals first four batters — Jerry Hairston, Ian Desmond, Ryan Zimmerman and Michael Morse — combined to go 7-for-14, they scored five runs and drove in six. 
Francisco Cervelli’s broken left foot has been placed in a boot and it will not removed for four weeks. Cervelli is expected to miss at least six weeks with the spring injury, something of which he is all too familiar. In 2008, Cervelli was involved in a home-plate collision with the Rays’ Eliot Johnson and suffered a broken wrist. In 2009, he was slowed throughout the spring with pneumonia and last season he suffered a concussion when he struck by a pitch from the Blue Jays’ Zech Zincola.  . . .  Right-hander Andrew Brackman, coming back from a strained groin, threw 10 bullpen tosses and then threw a simulated inning on Saturday. He will get a chance to pitch in a game next week. Brackman, 25, had hopes of making the team this spring but he likely will begin the year as a starter at Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.  . . .  Despite the work at the plate by Vazquez, Eric Chavez still appears to be frontrunner to back up at first and third base because of his defensive skills at third.  . . .  Montero took a foul tip off a knuckle on his right hand on Saturday but he stayed in the game.
The hard-luck Yankees will hit the road to Kissimmee, FL, on Sunday to meet the Houston Astros for the second time this spring. Phil Hughes will make his second Grapefruit League start for the Yankees. He will be opposed by veteran right-hander Brett Myers.
Game-time will be 1:05 p.m. EST and the game will not be telecast.

Even You Can Beat Yankees



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